Four Athens: Fostering Tech Entrepreneurs in Athens

BY TAYLOR BROOKS

Five years ago Jim Flannery moved to Athens fresh from college hoping to start his own business. Like many, Flannery couldn’t find a job, but insisted on staying in the Classic City. Roughly after a year of being in Athens, Flannery co-founded his own business, found a few partners and decided to start a resource for young entrepreneurs in Athens.

Today Flannery spends his days in meetings, reaching out to the public and trying to facilitate strong ties within the community for the organization he co-founded, Four Athens. Flannery currently serves as project director for the organization, which is tucked away in a modest office-space on East Dougherty Street.

Four Athens is a collection of mentors, volunteers, and creative individuals from the community that offer resources, funding, and guidance for young entrepreneurs in the Athens area looking to expand their technological-based businesses.

Four Athens has quite a strong relationship with the Athens Downtown Development Authority. The ADDA partnered with Four Athens to offer its startups rent subsidies to obtain a physical space downtown at a cheaper price.

ADDA executive director Pamela Thompson stated, “The ADDA thinks that Four Athens has a unique approach to helping develop local talent, connecting them to resources to succeed, and allowing us to partner with them to provide space downtown. This helps keep great talent local.”

Four Athens’ philosophy states, “Four Athens believes that Athens possesses all of ingredients necessary to create a strong technology startup hub.”

Startups are small businesses with high growth potential. Four Athens startups must have a technological component whether it is software, involving programming or coding, or hardware, the physical device.

Flannery believes Athens has an excellent market for startups due to the large amount of young, college- educated citizens in the community and the growing numbers of students leaving the university who want to stay and build their dreams in Athens.

Four Athens funds tech based startups, which are increasingly growing around the country. CNN.com listed 9 out of 10 of their top startups to watch as being technology based companies.

Tech based businesses consistently show up in our everyday lives, originating from all over the country and world. Examples range from Tunewolf, a local startup sponsored by Four Athens in the form of an app that allows users to choose songs from a virtual jukebox the venue creates, to the California based social media, photo-sharing app, Instagram.

The Calvin Institute did a study two years ago and conducted that high-tech startups are what’s creating the most jobs.” Flannery said. “In Georgia, for tech jobs, the average salary is $81,000 a year – the monumental impact that could have on Athens just can’t be understated. So, let’s focus on tech startups.”

Flannery believes it is too early to judge any success stories from the startups in the downtown area, but the organization has been growing steadily since Four Athens began two years ago.

In the next few years I’m not looking to see a big liquidation from one of our startups,” said Flannery. “But how we have affected the downtown area is by bringing people here. You’re downtown because of us, I’ve had three meetings today, all downtown. That’s really on the micro level, though. We’re looking to get the 100, the 1,000 people employed.”

Recently Four Athens and the ADDA have partnered together to sponsor Hatch Athens, a new local “makerspace” downtown.

The ADDA offered a rent subsidy through Four Athens for the organization to have a place to hold meetings and organize their members.

Hatch Athens is devoted to bringing people together in the community and other surrounding communities with skills, tools, and experience to design and create.

Through this startup makers and creators can come together, get hands on, and actually create physical products. According to Flannery, these are more “hardware” type products when it comes to their technological component.

Hatch Athens holds a monthly event at the Four Athens East Dougherty Street location called “First Friday Hackathon” where individuals from the community are urged to come together, create something, then choose a winner.

The Quad is another recent partnership downtown with Four Athens.

The Quad is a co-working space aimed at designers in the software field. Here the co-workers have access to internet, a conference room, desk spaces, and offices all located downtown.

The potential for tech startups to prosper is much greater with these recent partnerships that allow large spaces for the startups to meet, collaborate, and connect with one other to generate even more ideas.

Four Athens also takes advantage of the University of Georgia.

Flannery is often a guest speaker in university classes. The organization also has strong ties with the Terry Business of College New Venture Launch Competition, and is involved in the campus-wide entrepreneurial week and career fairs.

We do a lot of one-on-one basis things with the university and I would like to see that formalize over time,” said Flannery. “In most cities our size, in the Southeast, universities are financially supporting community-based incubators, to give students graduating with ideas a platform for a year or two. Which is what we’re doing as well.”

Strong ties with the ADDA, University of Georgia, and countless mentors, volunteers, and creators from the Athens area keeps Four Athens an ever growing, but important organization for our community.

Finally, when asked what was fundamentally important to Four Athens as a whole, Flannery answered,

Community. Companies are built by people and at the end of the day nothing else matters. It’s about finding those communities that can find those people to build those companies.”

Advertisements

Restaurant Health Inspections Anything but Consistent

By: Colson Barnes and Whitney M. Wyszynski

“It could be as simple as an open soda can in the kitchen,” said Kyu Lee, manager of Wingster.

He shook his head and shrugged, thinking about the health inspection score of 70 percent Wingster received on Nov. 13, 2012.

A window behind the cash register showed the cook busy preparing a variety of sauces.  The phone buzzed with delivery orders.  Anxious customers ordering delivery are unable to see the health score mounted next to the door.

“Simple things will deduct points from the score,” Lee said, looking at the kitchen. “We all have different responsibilities to clean this place.”

Restaurants like Wingsters are inspected one to two times per year by the Clarke County Health Department.  An analysis of restaurant scores in Athens revealed:

■      The Northeast Georgia Health District does not update the restaurant inspection website regularly.

■      There is no consistent system for documenting the scores online, and past scores are not archived online for public access.

■      The time of day, inspector, and time of year can affect a restaurant’s health score.

Nationwide Trends

According to the New York Times, many restaurant operators complain that numerical scores “can be confusing or deceptive.”  Customers often do not know the specific policies that detracted from the optimal score.

The Times-Picayune determined that Louisiana’s restaurant inspectors were more lenient than national counterparts.  The paper determined that “the difference seems to be in how each municipality enforces its safety regulations.”

“But restaurateurs complain, reasonably, that it’s a racket for the city to squeeze more money out of them,” Forbes writer, Josh Barro said. “A restaurant that gets a bad grade is inclined to pay for a re-inspection so it can display an A, but it still has to pay penalties based on the negative results of the first inspection.”

The Georgia Department of Community Health, through the county health departments, sends an inspector to inspect facilities where food is consumed on or off the premises.

Six inspectors monitor restaurants in Athens, and they do not notify the restaurants before the inspection occurs.  The names of the inspectors are not provided to the public.

Restaurants are given a numerical score from 0-100 based on the cleanliness of the facility. A score less than 70 is considered a failing grade; however, the restaurant will receive a follow-up inspection within 10 days.

Restaurant inspection scores are listed on the Clarke County Health Department website, with the date and brief explanations of violations.

After interviewing representatives at restaurants with the five lowest health ratings, many agreed that the regulations have become more difficult.  Wingster, Johnny’s New York Style Pizza, Plantation Buffet, Jimmy John’s, and Waffle House scored the lowest, as of Mar. 7, 2013.

[Would your kitchen pass a health department inspection?]

Some of the most popular restaurants fall short of a passing grade due to wrong food temperature control, improperly marked foods and poor employee health.

Food inspections are divided into two categories—critical and non-critical.  Deductions that have risk factors outlined by The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) are considered critical. The non-critical categories include factors that are designated by the Federal Food and Drug Administration.

[What are the most common violations?]

Success Stories

Howard Anderson, manager of the Jimmy John’s on Baxter Street, has worked with Jimmy John’s since 2006.

“We are very systematic here. We have a punch list that comes from Jimmy John’s corporate, but it doesn’t take into account the Georgia health regulations,” Anderson said.

Jimmy John’s scored 75 percent on its Mar. 7, 2013 inspection.  Anderson headed for the Health Department a mere day after the original inspection.

“I went to talk to the health inspector about what we can do to improve our score,” he said. “I retrained everyone on hand washing and the basic lessons about diseases.”

Anderson believes it was a lack of training that was the problem, but he also noted that this inspection was different than past inspections.

“It was more difficult this past time,” Anderson said.  He noted that some other restaurants may not be following some of the lesser known policies.

“She [the inspector] was specific about things like needing to spray the floor before we sweep it,” Anderson said.

Jimmy John’s on Baxter St. worked to improve. The restaurant’s score skyrocketed to a 100 percent on the follow-up inspection.

Herschel’s Famous 34, a new restaurant on Broad Street, received a 100 percent on its first inspection.

“I think it definitely makes a difference [to have a good health score],” said Lee Purser, Herschel’s Famous 34 manager.

Health inspection scores are a glimpse of the restaurant’s performance, but most establishments want a perfect score, according to Andrea Kerr, the environmental health manager at the Clarke Country Health Department.

“It is unrealistic to expect that a complex, full-service food operation can routinely avoid any violations,” the health department website highlighted. “An inspection conducted on any given day may not be representative of the overall, long-term cleanliness of an establishment.”

Ms. Kerr said the food service inspection scores are uploaded to the Northeast Health District website nightly.  However, Jimmy John’s follow-up inspection score from Mar. 13, 2013 was not updated until Mar. 26, 2013, per this blog’s request.

There is no consistent system for denoting follow-up scores.  Some restaurants, like Wingster, display the most recent score, whereas other restaurants, such as Wok Star, display both the original and follow-up score.

Psychology in Decision-Making

Many psychological studies have determined the effects of extraneous factors on decision-making.  Factors, such as the time of day, day of the week, and weather conditions, can affect a person’s decisions.

“Even patently false or irrelevant information often affects choices in significant ways,” according to the New York Times.

A recent study at the California Institute of Technology determined that people’s value judgments affect decision-making.  Value-based decisions occur in the prefrontal cortex, which affects personality expression and social behavior.

The prefrontal cortex is known for the executive function.  This function differentiates between conflicting thoughts—better and best, good and bad, and correct and incorrect.

Inspector discretion plays a key role in restaurant health scores.  Local restaurants complain that certain inspectors are tougher than others.

Possible Solution

The names of inspectors are not released publically, and past scores are not archived on the Northeast Georgia Health District website.  Assigning ID numbers to inspectors could be a possible solution.

ID numbers could be disclosed on the website, and if citizens spotted suspicious score fluctuations, they could report findings to the health department.  This would protect the inspector’s identity while monitoring the consistency of the scores.

Inspector discretion affects the public’s view of a restaurant, and this system could make the process more transparent.


Increased levels of Internet usage cause mental and physical symptoms

Craving a sloppy milkshake and a greasy burger, Lindsey Gaff anticipated a trip to The Grill all week.  The local burger joint is a staple of the Athens community, and as a junior at the University of Georgia, she felt it was her obligation to frequent the unique restaurant.

Hours before meeting her friends, she received a text message that they were meeting at Panera instead.  Forced to submit to healthy soups and organic sandwiches instead, she inquired why they had changed locations.

“Simple. They have WiFi.”

Gaff’s encounter epitomizes how people make consumer decisions based on technological dependence.  Though jokes about Internet addiction have existed for over a decade, researchers now see mental and physical symptoms associated with excessive Internet usage.

According to the New York Times, “The insight may not sound revelatory to anyone who has joked about the “crackberry” lifestyle…but hearing it from leaders at many of Silicon Valley’s most influential companies, who profit from people spending more time online, can sound like auto executives selling muscle cars while warning about the dangers of fast acceleration.”

Top executives from Google, Facebook, and Twitter gather annually at conferences to discuss how to find balance in the digital age.

Soren Gordhamer organizes Wisdom 2.0, one such conference.  Gordhamer said, “We’re done with this honeymoon phase and now we’re in this phase that says, ‘Wow, what have we done?’”

For many people, Gordhamer raises a key question: What effects could increased Internet dependence cause?

A study by the Educational Psychology Review found that the “Internet itself is not addictive, but that some specific Internet applications contribute to the development of pathological Internet use.”

Internet applications with interactive purposes are the most dangerous.  As users scroll mindlessly through Facebook or Twitter, they disengage from the world.

Interactive applications are most popular with college students.  The study found that the average person spends 6.75 hours per month on-line, whereas the average college student devotes 51.6 hours per month to Internet usage.

Many students admitted to spending more than 3 consecutive hours on-line twice in the previous week.

Students who registered as excessive Internet users also reported that they get less than 4 hours of sleep due to online activity, look for alternative ways to get access to the Internet and use online activity to feel better when experiencing depression.

Megan Ernst experienced such feelings of loss when her technological devices depleted of power.  “All of my technology just died.  I feel so alone,” the second-year student lamented in class.

These effects on health and wellbeing seep into other aspects of life, including work and leisure.

According to Harry E. Owens, Athens Director of Human Resources, “Young adults’ dependence on technology is apparent.  Increasingly, they are unable to hold a conversation, and they want everything on the Internet.”

As students’ time on the Internet increases, they begin ordering books online rather than visiting local bookstores.  Instead of wasting gas on a trip to a nearby restaurant, students use food delivery services and place orders online.

This new consumer behavior is troubling for towns like Athens, Ga., where college students are one of the primary consumers.

Athens native Lee Mason remembers how downtown Athens really grew up around the university.   He recalled how when the mall migrated to the west end of Athens, downtown became “a haunt of the town.”

“Small businesses and students really got downtown thriving again.  Athens wouldn’t be what it is without all of the students,” Mason said.

Currently, there are no conventional restaurants in downtown Athens that offer free WiFi (Internet access).  Crowded coffee shops capitalize on students’ dependence on WiFi, while local restaurants focus on traditional dining times.

By incorporating Internet usage into the dining experience, restaurants could expand their clientele.

Some restaurants, like Pauley’s, use technology to increase efficiency by taking orders via iPad.

As thousands of students cycle through Athens every few years, businesses need to adopt new technological models in order to stay relevant.

Anton Troianovski of The Wall Street Journal noted how McDonald’s and Starbucks combined offer 19,000 WiFi-equipped restaurants in comparison to a mere 15,000 WiFi-enabled public libraries nationwide.

As Internet dependence increases, WiFi hotspot developers like Henry Kurkowski see restaurants offering free WiFi as “quid pro quo.”  In other words, consumers expect WiFi from businesses as an exchange of goods and services.

Kurkowski says, “The bottom line is that WiFi puts butts in seats…Wi-Fi as an amenity is proven to boost business from college students, mobile business people and meeting planners.”